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Reemi

Reemi.

Reemi is a social enterprise and non-profit that exists to see humans flourish everywhere. AS Colour has partnered with Reemi to help workers in our factories.

 

 

 

Why Work Together?

Reemi, one of our charity partners, is working in Bangladesh to educate and provide culturally appropriate products for menstrual health needs. Reemi’s work centers on making periods equitable for all – believing no one should be held back because of their body doing what it was designed to do. At its core, this work is about dignity, education, and long-term positive change.

 

Partnering together allows us to have a greater impact on the lives of garment workers - typically some of the most vulnerable people in the world.

 
 

Why is This Important?

 

Approximately *85% of Bangladeshi women don’t use sanitary products because they are unaffordable or inaccessible. Instead, many garment workers forage scrap fabric from the factory floor to use during their period, which is unhygienic and dangerous to their health. Due to social stigma, women resort to drying menstrual cloth in secret—in damp, mouldy, and unhygienic places, like under their bed. A recent report showed that *73% of Bangladeshi factory workers miss an average of six days of work per month.

 

This is because of the shame around menstruation, coupled with the health problems that result from using unhygienic period products, resulting in the majority of women losing the income they desperately need.

*WSSCC, ‘Celebrating Womanhood’, 2021.

Our Mission

 

At one of our garment factories in Bangladesh, Reemi is conducting leading research in the field of menstrual stigma and the adoption of new health technology. This means our garment workers have access to education around menstrual health, helping to break down social stigma and increase awareness of hygiene risks. Together, we’ve also been able to produce and distribute culturally appropriate menstrual health products that put an end to those hygiene risks. These products are reusable which means affordability or lack of access to products is no longer a problem. We’re excited to see the flow-on effects of this work, as women no longer need to skip days of work because of these issues.

 

 


Breakdown of Research

The research Reemi has conducted in an AS Colour factory has drawn out a whole lot of data that helps us collaborate to find solutions that actually work for the people we’re working with. Here are a few key findings:

 

  • Between half and three quarters of women experience fears and anxiety during their menstruation related to public stigmatization. Their biggest worry is fear of blood stains.

  • Around 1/3 of women cover their face or seek out a store far away when buying menstrual products, to increase anonymity.

  • 75% of the women not using pads report not using them because buying them makes them uncomfortable.

  • Two thirds of the women (average age 26) did not know about menstruation before their first period. Of those who knew about it, the large majority did not learn about menstruation from their mother.

  • Workers are still using their Reemi designed period products after more than 7 months and rate the products very highly.

 

Reemi has identified that education is a huge part of their work—helping to break down taboos and social stigma, and facilitating a safe space to have these conversations. This work will have a really vital trickledown effect. Aiding these conversations will mean mothers are more likely to pass their menstrual education to their daughters, something that has not been commonly done before.

 

The other side of their work is developing and providing access to products that deal with these key issues and barriers when it comes to menstrual health management.

Culturally Appropriate Menstrual Products

We love that Reemi prioritises human-centered design. This means that they work with local communities to understand their needs before ever assuming any kind of solution. Bangladesh has its own unique cultural makeup—meaning some period care products (such as cups) are inappropriate. The challenge was to find a solution that works for the people who will be using it—along with many other considerations such as environmental footprint, affordability, and social norms.

 

  • More than 500 people were supported (through education and products) in 2021

  • One AS Colour factory had all their female workers receive period products at the end of 2020. These products were made by a social enterprise that supports women that were previously trafficked.

  • We are measuring the holistic impact of our interventions e.g. how much people like our products, reduced costs, improved health outcomes, reduced sick days and transfer of knowledge to their children.

  • Our products take into consideration ongoing costs of pads, the high need for discreet products, reusability, access to water, cultural taboos, lack of access to waste disposal, patriarchal environments and access to products (ie. distribution channels).

  • Our education takes into consideration low literacy rates, encouraging sharing between co-workers, stigma reduction, cultural sensitivities and locally-led health trainers to facilitate sessions.

 

 

 

Moving Forward

In October Reemi started another education and research program in a second AS Colour factory. The program will finish its final stages early 2022. We hope our work with Reemi continues to have a positive impact and grows in its reach and continue to adapt to the changes or obstacles as they arise.

As the findings from this research are formalised, we’re going to have a much deeper understanding of the true impact of this work. Expanding on our collective knowledge, and aiding Reemi in sharing education and resources with more people in need - having the greatest positive impact as our key focus.

The Impact

 

At its simplest, the impact of this partnership is about improving the lives of people who need it most. Typically garment workers are some of the most economically vulnerable people in the world. We’re here to raise the standard.

 

 

 

What Else Does Reemi do?

 

Reemi makes and sells period underwear as a more environmentally sustainable alternative to pads or tampons. All profits go straight to their work in Bangladesh - so when you buy their underwear, you’re championing period equity globally.

 

 

 

How Can You help?

 

 

By doing this, you’re voting for a better future for all, prioritizing economic dignity for the lives of the people who make your clothes.

Reemi.

 

Reemi is a social enterprise and non-profit that exists to see humans flourish everywhere. AS Colour has partnered with Reemi to help workers in our factories.

 

 

Why Work Together?

Reemi, one of our charity partners, is working in Bangladesh to educate and provide culturally appropriate products for menstrual health needs. Reemi’s work centers on making periods equitable for all – believing no one should be held back because of their body doing what it was designed to do. At its core, this work is about dignity, education, and long-term positive change.

 

Partnering together allows us to have a greater impact on the lives of garment workers - typically some of the most vulnerable people in the world.

 
 

Why is This Important?

 

Approximately *85% of Bangladeshi women don’t use sanitary products because they are unaffordable or inaccessible. Instead, many garment workers forage scrap fabric from the factory floor to use during their period, which is unhygienic and dangerous to their health. Due to social stigma, women resort to drying menstrual cloth in secret—in damp, mouldy, and unhygienic places, like under their bed. A recent report showed that *73% of Bangladeshi factory workers miss an average of six days of work per month.

 

This is because of the shame around menstruation, coupled with the health problems that result from using unhygienic period products, resulting in the majority of women losing the income they desperately need.

*WSSCC, ‘Celebrating Womanhood’, 2021.

Our Mission

 

At one of our garment factories in Bangladesh, Reemi is conducting leading research in the field of menstrual stigma and the adoption of new health technology. This means our garment workers have access to education around menstrual health, helping to break down social stigma and increase awareness of hygiene risks. Together, we’ve also been able to produce and distribute culturally appropriate menstrual health products that put an end to those hygiene risks. These products are reusable which means affordability or lack of access to products is no longer a problem. We’re excited to see the flow-on effects of this work, as women no longer need to skip days of work because of these issues.

 

 


Breakdown of Research

The research Reemi has conducted in an AS Colour factory has drawn out a whole lot of data that helps us collaborate to find solutions that actually work for the people we’re working with. Here are a few key findings:

 

  • Between half and three quarters of women experience fears and anxiety during their menstruation related to public stigmatization. Their biggest worry is fear of blood stains.

  • Around 1/3 of women cover their face or seek out a store far away when buying menstrual products, to increase anonymity.

  • 75% of the women not using pads report not using them because buying them makes them uncomfortable.

  • Two thirds of the women (average age 26) did not know about menstruation before their first period. Of those who knew about it, the large majority did not learn about menstruation from their mother.

  • Workers are still using their Reemi designed period products after more than 7 months and rate the products very highly.

 

Reemi has identified that education is a huge part of their work—helping to break down taboos and social stigma, and facilitating a safe space to have these conversations. This work will have a really vital trickledown effect. Aiding these conversations will mean mothers are more likely to pass their menstrual education to their daughters, something that has not been commonly done before.

 

The other side of their work is developing and providing access to products that deal with these key issues and barriers when it comes to menstrual health management.

Culturally Appropriate Menstrual Products

We love that Reemi prioritises human-centered design. This means that they work with local communities to understand their needs before ever assuming any kind of solution. Bangladesh has its own unique cultural makeup—meaning some period care products (such as cups) are inappropriate. The challenge was to find a solution that works for the people who will be using it—along with many other considerations such as environmental footprint, affordability, and social norms.

 

  • More than 500 people were supported (through education and products) in 2021

  • One AS Colour factory had all their female workers receive period products at the end of 2020. These products were made by a social enterprise that supports women that were previously trafficked.

  • We are measuring the holistic impact of our interventions e.g. how much people like our products, reduced costs, improved health outcomes, reduced sick days and transfer of knowledge to their children.

  • Our products take into consideration ongoing costs of pads, the high need for discreet products, reusability, access to water, cultural taboos, lack of access to waste disposal, patriarchal environments and access to products (ie. distribution channels).

  • Our education takes into consideration low literacy rates, encouraging sharing between co-workers, stigma reduction, cultural sensitivities and locally-led health trainers to facilitate sessions.

 

 

 

Moving Forward

In October Reemi started another education and research program in a second AS Colour factory. The program will finish its final stages early 2022. We hope our work with Reemi continues to have a positive impact and grows in its reach and continue to adapt to the changes or obstacles as they arise.

As the findings from this research are formalised, we’re going to have a much deeper understanding of the true impact of this work. Expanding on our collective knowledge, and aiding Reemi in sharing education and resources with more people in need - having the greatest positive impact as our key focus.

The Impact

 

At its simplest, the impact of this partnership is about improving the lives of people who need it most. Typically garment workers are some of the most economically vulnerable people in the world. We’re here to raise the standard.

 

 

 

What Else Does Reemi do?

 

Reemi makes and sells period underwear as a more environmentally sustainable alternative to pads or tampons. All profits go straight to their work in Bangladesh - so when you buy their underwear, you’re championing period equity globally.

 

 

 

How Can You help?

 

 

By doing this, you’re voting for a better future for all, prioritizing economic dignity for the lives of the people who make your clothes.


Ethical Production Guide.